RICHIBI’S WEBLOG

was nice enough to write up an article today about me and my poem, How To Read My Poems. Take a minute to check it out HERE.

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2000 FOLLOWS TODAY!

Thank you all so much! 2012 has been a good year. Here’s to 2000 more in 2013!

A few things:

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HALLOWEEN COSTUMES

What’s everyone being for Halloween?

Send pictures of your costume to bricemaiurro@gmail.com and I’ll post them up on my page.

God, I love Halloween.

SORRY FOR THE BAD LIGHTING, BUT THIS IS ME AS ZOMBIE HUNTER S. THOMPSON (HUNTER S. ZOMPSON, IF YOU WILL) AT THE DENVER ZOMBIE CRAWL THIS YEAR.

AND NOW WE PRAY

just thought i’d shoot from the hip today. last night, i drank some wine with some of my best friends, logan and emma. it was wonderful. we talked. just sat here in this basement apartment and exchanged stories and laughed and were as honest as people should always be.

this is what it’s all about, folks. i know there’s a big battle going on out there for the american throne, but while people are out there trying to choose coke or pepsi, trying to sway the wind in the direction they prefer, i think we’re missing out on something important. sometimes i think we get so hooked on foreign policy, we forget the most miniscule of domestic policy. how to talk to one another. i’m not the first one to say it, and i won’t be the last.

the elections always make me see this great polarization between people. all of a sudden we seem to be in a civil war with democrats versus republicans. the system isn’t perfect. if you can’t acknowledge that, then you’ve got some thinking to do, but what i know of this world is we are all radical agents of change. we were given the ability to think things into existence.

what i’m trying to get at is we should stop putting up signs about diversity, and start talking to people who are different than us, and we are all different. we are all some version of weird and some version of interesting. we are all a hodgepodge of stories waiting to be heard. all we can do is share experience to learn to love better.

treat people behind counters like human beings. call the people you love who are far away. call the ones who are close. meet your neighbors. respect everyone. i heard a poem once at the mercury cafe, here in denver, where the poet said “why is honoring your children not a commandment?” there is a lot of truth in that.

i’ve been having a rough time, lately. the writing hasn’t been coming as strongly. i’ve felt a very heavy boulder on my shoulders and i’ve tried so many things to cure what ails me. in the end, i know i need the people around me. buildings without people are just archaeology. a testament to what once happened there. it’s not a stage until the lights come up and someone says something to someone. kerouac says “because in the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. climb that goddamn mountain.” but i think it’s clear that mountain isn’t just hiking mount everest. it’s not going on a road trip to the end of the world. these things are important, but each time you talk to someone you’ve never talked to before, heart-to-heart, you are climbing that goddamn mountain.

i know this has all been said, but i don’t think you can hear it too much. this isn’t my normal type of post, but i never want to lie to my audience. i want to have heart-to-hearts with my readers, because i know no one cares how intelligent i can make myself seem. no one cares what the most interesting mask i can put on is. the trick is to rip the mask off. to rip off the cover of the book and start reading.

thanks for reading,
love,
brice

BOOK UPDATE AND SOME RANDOM STUFF

I’ve got a lot on my mind, so I’m just gonna shoot from the hip.

Book will come out in October. Tell all your friends. I am not going to sell 100 copies of this book either and call it a success. That is not the person I am. I am going to sell the shit out of this book of poetry, if for no other reason to prove that you can sell a book of poetry. I am going to make Barnes and Noble crave my book of poetry. I am going to win over the hearts of the non-poetry readers and I am going to establish myself as a Denver poet.

It’s going to be the most terrifying experience of my life.

Next note. Writer’s block. It sucks. It happens. I wrote hundreds of poems this year. As of lately – haven’t written anything. Well, I write stuff, but it’s not worth its weight in… anything. I am in transition, got a lot of stuff going on in my life. I’m trying to lose weight. I’m trying to be extremely outgoing instead of slightly outgoing. I’m trying to get out of debt. And I’m starting to hit bonus at work again, which is great because it helps fund my passion.

Each day I’m a step closer to writing as a career. A step closer to making my passion my job. And god would it be nice. (I know, lofty poet dreams of writing poetry for a career. Doesn’t happen, but – I will try and! I have short stories and a novel in progress to help.)

Did I mention this post is ADD-fueled?

My blood is Cherry Coke Zero right now.

I received a rejection letter today on my poetry, and I’m sorry but those still burn. They will always burn. You mail your heart off to some indiscriminate land where you have no idea what they are doing to the poor helpless creature and two months later, you receive a kindly worded rejection letter. It’s a rejection letter. How could that not hurt? Imagine if you got an e-mail that said you weren’t a very good lover. Imagine if you got an e-mail that said the foundation that you have built your life upon is a bedrock of lies. I know; my pieces just weren’t right for you. Please submit again. What it is more than anything is the moment before you open the rejection letter and that happy fairy flies into your soul through your ear and you think this is it, and then you open that e-mail and the fairy dies because no one is clapping and no one believes in fairies.

Take a breath.

Okay. Next topic. I am so excited for this blog. I have a habit of travelling through things at 150 miles per hour, but burn through my tank of gas way too quickly. I’m excessive, then I fizzle out. This blog will not fizzle out. This blog will only get stronger. So on that note, I ask you, dear reader, what do you want to see? More contests? More poetry? Does anyone want to interview me? I’m not famous but I’ll try to be interesting for you. I am a writer in search of an audience and I want to be a gear in the conversation machine.

Because when it all comes down to it, I agree with my college professor; the biggest disease of humanity is loneliness. Let’s talk. Let’s break down walls. Let’s not be afraid to be our ugly beautiful selves. Never be afraid to whore yourself on my blog either. If you’ve got something you want the world to see (and it doesn’t belong on a porn site) show it. That’s what this is all about. I want to help foster this.

I’m gonna start reviewing stuff. I’m reading Bukowski (again). Be ready for a long review on The Pleasures of the Damned.

Really, this is it. If God is gonna pull the plug on my poetry machine, I am going to manually power any machines I can by stationary bicycle. I think a break from poetry will be good anyways. I want to take this chance to stop writing alone in notebooks and start writing out loud to the world. I want to end the monologue and begin the dialogue. I want to listen more than I speak.

And I hope you’re still reading this. I look forward to getting to know all of you better.

Sincerely,

Starry-Eyed and Running on E

TIPS FOR WRITING BETTER GOD DAMN POETRY, PART TWO

A Response to Vincent Wolfram and the Comments on November, Revisited

The first thing I feel weird that I have to mention is I do not think poetry is dead. I think poetry is very much alive. We live in a time where poetry is all around us. Mostly, I think this is the acknowledgement that good writing often is poetry. The dialogue in movies, songs on the radio – I won’t patronize you anymore – the point is poetry is everywhere.

What my last article is a challenge to is writing like yourself and writing to push the envelope. I respect people who write in a classic style of poetry; there is a lot of classic poetry that I love. The last article, and this one are simply a calling. For those of you out there who want to escape the cobwebs of the basement and climb the stairs to the world around you, to being heard, I challenge you to write like yourself.

And now, we backstep. Write like yourself. “I can rhyme, and still write like myself,” “I can use a formal rhythm and write like myself,” True. But I want to hear your god damn heartbeat. I want to hear the speed at which blood flows through your veins. I want to see the soul in your eyes without a pair of Oliver People’s glasses warping my view point. I want to hear what you sound like naked.
And so do the masses. The conundrum I face, and lots of writers face, is how to write what you want to say, but also write to be heard. I spent a long time trying to write what people wanted to hear, and that failed miserably for some reason. Never write to be relevant. Never write to be outlandish. Never write to be political. Just write your heart.

I just watched a documentary on Lenny Bruce, Looking for Lenny, and this said a lot on this subject. Every good comedian today knows who Lenny Bruce is, and many of them spend their whole careers trying to be Lenny Bruce, and therein is the problem. They are not Lenny Bruce. If you are not familiar with Lenny Bruce, Reader’s Digest version, he is a God because he was completely, no-holds-barred, honest to himself. He was speaking on social issues in comedy in a time no one else was, but that’s the thing. Every comedian since has said “I’ll speak on social issues.” No. Lenny Bruce didn’t speak on social issues. He spoke what was on his mind. Gut-to-mouth. Heart-to-mouth. No filter tip.

Ginsberg didn’t write Howl trying to change the world. He simply howled. That’s the whole thing.

One user said I have a “hijacked mantra,” and that’s simply not true. Yes, I’m not saying anything that’s not been said before, but it’s no “mantra”. People speak from their hearts and sometimes someone comes along and labels it “Dadism,” labels it “The Beat Generation,” labels it “Second-Wave Feminism”. William Burroughs was adamant about not being labeled, and I don’t really think anyone ever wants to be labeled, but that seems to be the way of art. The outrageous becomes the mundane, and the original becomes the status quo. The upside of it all is we are born with a bullshit meter that allows us to see the truth; some of us just choose to use it more than others.

Part of me wants to say we’ve all become afraid to say what’s on our minds, but I think the truth is this battle is always there, and what I’m writing is my miniature battle cry to the poets to take advantage of the opportunity they have. What better chance to amplify the rust that’s grinding your gears than poetry? Another user quoted Ginsberg: “Follow your inner moonlight.” Yes. Follow your inner moonlight.
Chase the roads inside of yourself and eventually when they can no longer stand it, they will burst out of you and into the world around you.

Changing notes a bit, I’d like to say Vincent Wolfram made my day. In his article, he tears down a lot of things that I said, but it was so refreshing to hear someone doing just that, and tastefully too.
Vincent seems to be a proponent for formalism, and for poetry that you have to dig a little deeper to get into, and for that, I can only applaud him. If you want to write formally, who am I to stop you? Clearly there is a passion there. I really think it boils down to a matter of style and substance. Don’t get me wrong. That’s not to say that Vincent’s poetry is less substance and more style. It’s all just a matter of how you choose to combine the two. I don’t think I could do it. I couldn’t write the formal verses. I mean, with time and dedication, I’m sure they would come, but it’s not what drives me.

Pardon my ADD, but changing gears a bit again. Reading over Vincent’s article I just found where he says “Don’t trust poets that say they don’t read poetry.” I agree. All poets have read other poets. Bukowski said don’t read other poets. Bullshit. Read away. Just don’t try to be other poets. That’s the problem, I think. Ginsberg said “Find your inner moonlight,” not “Find someone else’s inner moonlight.” Your soul, I think, should be your ultimate inspiration, and whatever gets thrown into the machine while its processing the parts is just bonus.

It’s true when Wolfram says I’m suspicious of formal poetry. Mostly, because I don’t see it on the bookshelves. I don’t hear it in the poetry cafes. I don’t see it on the billboards. Maybe I hear it on the radio, I haven’t decided on that one yet. (Please, opinions are welcome on that one.) I want to hear poetry through a loudspeaker, because if poetry is quiet. If poetry whispers and asks you to sit down with it and hear it out, it so easily could be overshadowed; lost underneath the sound of a million more vibrant things. Poetry, whether you want to admit it or not, is in a battle against television, against movies, even music in some regards. (Music and poetry have a love hate relationship, I think.)

Ooh. Here’s a big one I need to address. In my previous article, I called haikus “small words.” I need to clarify that. The idea of any writer calling any words “small words” is a bit ridiculous, really. What I mean to say is a haiku is a form, where in its most common form , it is five syllables, then seven syllables, then five syllables. Great things have been said in haiku, but to me, it’s like writing from inside of an iron maiden. Why would you condense yourself like that? It feels almost lazy to me. I could see the appeal of the snapshot. Maybe what it boils down to, is if you’re writing haikus, I hope you’re writing other things too.

This article is called “Tips” and I apologize that it’s seemed to turn more into a rebuttal to the first article, but I think this is an important part of learning how to write poetry, maybe the only way. To question what poetry is. What makes good poetry, what makes the bad. Really, I’m just trying to figure it out like anyone else, and I think I have to say that every bad poem out there is just a prerequisite to a good poem.

You know what? This isn’t even about poetry. This is about every damn aspect of your life. I want to see the real you. Yes, “to not know what happened before your born is to remain forever a child,” but what’s more important is to learn from it, to add to it. And I think the only way we can grow as people is to listen to the ghost in our machine; to exhale more viciously than any generation before, and more importantly to open our mouths wider for the inhale.

READ “TIPS ON WRITING BETTER GOD DAMN POETRY, PART ONE”