CAMERA OBSCURA

a darkened box, a convex
lens, an aperture.

a projection of image
of external object
onto screen.

a transference
of what once was
into what will be forever.

do you see it?
ten thousand dead eyes
staring out
from some digital plane
to the otherside.

and here we spend our days:

tossed and turned
in immediate reflection
of the moment before
this one.

(a watched pot
never boils)

and a watched clock
never moves.

a ticking time bomb
is a movie device
in which a deadline
is created
to give a growing sense
of anticipation;

we are all ticking time bombs

trying to place the
red wire to the green
no wait – the red.

in hopes
of becoming immortal.

in hopes
of being
remembered.

we step into the box
and we come out
two-dimensional.

we lay flat on our
backs

and we die each time
we close our
books.

she stares through
the ether

into this flesh
machine
i’ve become

some overpriced gear
of the eternal engine.

we pierce through the
snowy screen

to piece together
the pieces
of the life we could be
living.

(he said from a
keyboard (the
pot calling the kettle
black.))

the sun going
into sleep mode.

the sweet grass unavailable
as it goes through
a software update.

we created god
and he has swallowed us
whole.

i will be here.
lost in the belly of the
wail.

you look like
you’re having a great
time.

we’ll have to catch up
when you come back
home.

COPYRIGHT BRICE MAIURRO 2016

Author: brice maiurro

Denver poet. Author of Stupid Flowers, out now through Punch Drunk Press.

4 thoughts on “CAMERA OBSCURA”

  1. I like the way you change the landscape so quickly and unpredictably in this one. This line caught my eye: ” lost in the belly of the / wail.” but there are many others.

    ( unrelated to this post, I just read a book with facsimile images and transacriptons really well designed and presented ( spared no expense ) of Emily Dickinson’s scraps of poetry on envelopes she carried around with her in a pocket of her dress – intriguing, The book is titled:”The gorgeous nothings”. I gather that these were bits of paper that often just fell out of her manuscript collections when the manuscripts were opened in the Archives at Amherst University )

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